Tag Archives: Environmental Studies

Department Details: Environmental Studies

3 Feb
Who wouldn't want to protect this gorgeous view?!

Who wouldn’t want to protect this gorgeous Rockbridge County view?!

The Environmental Studies major and interdisciplinary minor require an understanding of the sciences, social sciences, and humanities. These programs are designed to educate students in a broad class of issues related to the environment and humanity’s place in the natural world.

Students employ this interdisciplinary approach to develop a comprehensive understanding of the causes, consequences, and solutions to environmental problems. Experiential learning opportunities are available through service learning courses, the US/Brazil exchange program, the Chesapeake Bay program and the spring semester abroad.

At Washington and Lee, we take an interdisciplinary approach to the study of the environment. Faculty and students from the sciences, the humanities, the social sciences, and law are involved in this approach through research, the curriculum, and a variety of co-curricular activities, including numerous public lectures, service learning projects, monthly luncheon seminars, as well as outdoor activities.

The program curriculum allows students to develop interdisciplinary expertise and an understanding of how insights from different disciplines complement each other. This is not only a unique academic experience, but also one that expands the students’ ability as citizens to be aware of the scientific, ethical, and policy issues they will face in their local communities, their professions and in their broader world community.

For more information on the Environmental Studies department, click here.

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Tour Guide Spotlight: Danielle Breidung ’13

14 Nov

Danielle Breidung ’13

 

Hometown: Waunakee, WI

Major(s)/Minor(s): Sociology/Environmental Studies & Poverty

What clubs/activities are you involved in on campus?
English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL), the Campus Kitchen (CKP), the Bonner Leaders Program, Outing Club, and the Generals Development Initiative (GDI)

How are you involved in the Lexington community?
I am a Bonner Leader, so my service takes me to diverse locations and organizations on a daily basis. Currently, I am teaching Spanish at Fairfield Elementary twice a week, tutoring Spanish-speaking children at Maury River Middle School also twice a week, serving as a mentor for Maury River’s Girl Talk program, and volunteering at Project Horizon. I enjoy doing shifts at Campus Kitchen on Sundays.

What are some of your other hobbies/interests?
I enjoy traveling, meeting new people, reading, cooking, and spending time with friends. Some of my interests include women’s rights in the developing world, domestic and international non-profit work, and eco-tourism’s positive and negative impact on traditional populations.

Favorite weekend activity? Walking, hiking, and/or biking on one of the local trails

Favorite thing about Lexington? It is a small, quaint community where one can truly make a difference, make long-lasting connections, and feel safe regardless of the time of day, not to mention the beautiful natural landscape, i.e. MOUNTAINS!

What’s your favorite W&L memory?
Last year, at the end of spring term, one of my best friends at W&L and I were sitting on the colonnade while we should have been packing and cleaning our rooms. It was about 12 a.m., and we were simply enjoying the peace and quiet, the stars overhead, and the amazing view from the steps of Washington Hall while reminiscing about all of the fun things that had occurred during our first-years in Lexington.

What’s the best encounter you’ve had with a faculty or staff member?
Last fall two other W&L students and I were studying abroad and conducting research in the Amazon. While there we had the opportunity to travel with three W&L faculty to Barcelos to gain familiarity with the communities in which we would be working throughout our experience in Brazil. This encounter was remarkable due to the fact that, there we were in the middle of the Amazon, and despite all of our differences, the one thing that brought us all together – professors and students alike- apart from being affiliated with W&L, was a passion for learning more about social and environmental justice in one of the world’s most breathtaking locations.

 

Spring Term Study Abroad

2 Nov

This week I decided to go on the Economics 288 spring term class going to Belize. W&L’s spring term is a four week long course at the end of the year. Since I have chosen not to study abroad for a whole semester, this gives me the opportunity to still study abroad. For this course we will be spending the first part of spring term in lexington taking classes, nine days in Belize, and then return to lexington for the end of spring term. In Belize we will be snorkeling and interactively learning about the environment. The class will focus on the effect of the tourist industry on economics in Belize. Other than economics, environmental studies will also be a focus for the course. I am looking forward to learning about this branch of economics and especially in such a beautiful place!